Brand Me a Journalist

Using Social Media to Create a Professional Niche

Committing (to) 26 acts of LinkedIn kindness

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As news organizations marked the first anniversary of the Newtown mass shooting last December, I noticed the revival of the #26acts and #26actsofkindness hashtags on social media. You may recall the hashtags originated when NBC’s Ann Curry appealed to her Twitter followers to commit 20 acts of kindness in honor of the shooting victims:

She eventually included the six adults who died, and the #26acts campaign went viral. Curry’s appeal inspired gestures from around the world. I loved seeing such an outpouring of kindness, and my family decided do our part by focusing on Hurricane Sandy relief. (I tweeted about it to support the effort and, to my surprise, ended up getting picked up in local news coverage of the acts.)

When the hashtags reappeared last month, I knew I wanted to join in again. I had recently given a talk about strengthening your LinkedIn profile and at the time was in the middle of helping my sister-in-law update hers. It felt really good to share what I knew to help with her job search –I’m an ESFJ, remember? – and in both of these instances, I realized how much I take for granted what I’ve learned as a social media specialist. What for me is a daily task can, for some, be an overwhelming obstacle. So I decided to help 26 friends and families members update their LinkedIn profiles and was really pleased to see how quickly people accepted the offer.  (Full disclosure: This tweet may suggest I’ve completed all 26 profiles, but I still have a few to go.)

A friend saw my tweet and encouraged me to blog about this experience, but at the time I didn’t see how it might be relevant to this blog. I really just wanted to do something nice for people I care about. That said, as I’ve worked with the first wave of profiles, I’ve already realized how this experience does, in fact, apply to an essential element of personal branding I’ve written about so many times: if you want to find success in your career in the age of social media, share what you know. That generosity of spirit builds trust and strengthens relationships, two essential factors in a successful journalism career. You may not immediately recognize the value of that sharing, but it will pay off.

I already have learned so much from this experience – yes, about LinkedIn and personal branding, but even more so about the rich stories within the professional lives of my friends and family. I’ll blog more about this surprisingly rewarding endeavor when I’ve completed my commitment.

Written by Jennifer Gaie Hellum

January 7, 2014 at 3:06 pm

5 tips for finding a journalism association that fits your niche and fuels your passion

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When I headed to LaGuardia for my flight to this year’s Online News Association conference, I unexpectedly found myself at my gate two hours early. Many ONA members work in New York, so I scanned the crowd, and, as expected, saw a friend nearby and joined him for a drink. (Why not, it’s journalism, right?)

I refer to this colleague as a friend, although I know him only from the previous three ONA conferences. (He and I both work in social media and have since kept in touch on Twitter.) When we were talking about how much we genuinely were looking forward to catching up with other ONA members, he said something that really struck a cord with me: “Going to ONA is like going to a family reunion.”

For me, reconnecting with someone I’ve met at the conference the year before or finally meeting a Twitter friend in real life nurtures my need for a sense of community in my career. And more often than not, those conversations lead to friendships and motivate me professionally. On the final night of this year’s conference, I talked with the Arizona Republic’s Megan Finnerty about her deep commitment to the Arizona Storytellers Project. Hearing the extraordinary effort she has put into making this project a success made me ask myself what more I could be doing to create excellent work.

Other journalists left ONA13 similarly compelled to up their games. In the weeks since the conference, Gannett’s Sarah Day Owen urgently declared a renewed commitment and accountability toward her career goals.

 

In a similar post, Michelle Minkoff, a data journalist for AP, celebrated that exhilarating feeling that happens when people with similar passion get exposed to each other’s expertise.

I know some people question the value – and the expense – of joining professional organizations, but I’ve found ONA to be an essential part of developing my career and building my brand. I first attended ONA10 while in grad school and gained invaluable insights into the state of the greater journalism industry. The following year I went to ONA11 as an employee at Gannett Phoenix and got to meet colleagues from other Gannett properties. And at ONA12, a cocktail-party conversation with another ONA/Twitter friend (like I was saying … ) led to a freelance opportunity with Spundge, a career move I would not have considered if it weren’t for a conference session I attended just days before on making the leap from the newsroom to a startup.

According to ONA director of operations Irving Washington, over 1,600 journalists attended ONA13, with nearly 640 first-time attendees. Joining ONA or any one of the 41 journalism associations in The Council of National Journalism Organizations can provide you a network of colleagues and guide your career. Most organizations have an annual conference – you’ve probably seen the hashtags in your Twitter feed – with sessions relevant to students, academics, freelancers and journalists working for news organizations.

So how can you find the group that’s right for your career?

Finding a journalism association that fits your niche and fuels your passion

  1. Ask your managers, colleagues and former professors which groups they’ve joined. I first learned about ONA from my online news professor. Other faculty members were active with Investigative Reporters & Editors, American Society of News Editors and National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association. If you work for a news organization, find out if it encourages membership in specific groups and whether membership fees can be included in your compensation package.
  2. Watch your Twitter feed. If you’re following other journalists, you’ve seen a steady stream of conference hashtags. Click through to the session schedule to determine whether the topics might interest you.
  3. Look at the LinkedIn profiles of your connections who do the jobs you’d like to do. LinkedIn profiles include a space to list organization memberships. Look at the Organizations subheading of the Background section for the associations other journalists have joined. (You may also want to look at the Groups section, which lists the LinkedIn groups individual users follow. That list could include journalism organizations in which they are interested but may not yet have official membership.)
  4. Spend some time on The Council of National Journalism Organizations siteThis comprehensive list of organizations includes medium-specific,  beat-specific, job-specific and interest-specific groups of journalists. Their Twitter list of 41 member organizations offers a quick way to start following several groups and see which conversations appeal to your interests.
  5. Visit specific organizations’ websites and review recent conference schedules. Before you invest in a membership, learn about the groups’ missions and priorities. Looking through past schedules should give you a good sense of what issues, trends, and tools the organizations find relevant.

 


 

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How a personal-branding leap of faith landed a rookie reporter her dream job

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For the past few years, Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication professor Tim McGuire has had me speak to his 21st Century Journalism class about developing their personal brandings. I love meeting each new graduate cohort and the Barrett Honors College students, and, in general, the students really seem to take my advice to heart.

From time to time, however, a student or two have questioned the value of putting in extra time and energy to manage portfolios, personal blogs and the countless social media profiles recommended for journalists. Each time, Tim has mentioned my blogging experience and other students’ social media use as examples of extracurricular online efforts that have helped launch careers. But when I spoke to his class last month, I had a fresh example of how that strategy had paid off for yet another Cronkite alum. I got to tell Tim’s class a fantastic story about Chierstin Susel, one of his former students who just got hired to do her dream job – without applying for it.

Without even knowing such a job existed. 

In a phone conversation from her parents’ home in Ohio, Chierstin told me how her deliberate decision to create an online presence paid off. Her story is a great lesson in being authentic and strategic.

Screen Shot 2013-12-08 at 12.03.37 AM

ASU Cronkite School graduate Chierstin Susel (Photo by Jez Noble)

Chierstin graduated in May and returned home to search for a sports reporting position in Ohio. A few months into her job search, she received an out-of-the-blue email from a hiring manager who found her sports reel on YouTube and suggested she apply for a job opening with his news organization. When he followed up the next day to discuss the opportunity, Chierstin said, she asked a pointed question.

“I said, ‘Hey, I just gotta ask you, how did you find me online?” His reply was as surprising as his initial call, according to Chierstin.

“He said, ‘Well, I was looking at someone’s reel that had applied, and I’ve never really done this before, but I randomly decided that I was going to search the videos that popped up on the side on YouTube,’” Chierstin said. He looked at several and was one click away from clicking on a Jimmy Kimmel video when he decided to look at one more reel.

“So he clicked on my reel,” Chierstin said, adding he knew the Cronkite School and had always been impressed with it. “From there he decided to Google me.” When he searched for her name, her blog Faith, Fashion, Fitness popped up, and she said it was then he knew she fit the description of who he was looking for.

Wait – Faith, Fashion, Fitness?

Conventional knowledge would suggest having a religion-centered blog is a rather bold move for a rookie journalist. In fact, Chierstin said she gave a lot of thought to the risk involved in revealing her faith through her blog. She and Tim had discussed that her Twitter profile and tweets clearly showed faith was very important to her and that it had the potential to set her apart from other journalists. The question was whether embracing that distinction was a good thing or a bad thing.

“I always thought that faith was something you should just leave out, that no one should know your faith or whatever. But at the same time, that’s a huge part of my life,” Chierstin said. “For (Tim) to come up and tell me that was like, alright, I’m totally going to include that in my blog.”

It turns out the decision to reveal her faith was a very good thing for Chierstin. The hiring manager who saw her reel had called from Liberty University’s Liberty Flames Sports Network, which had an opening for a program launching in January. In case you aren’t familiar with it, Liberty University is the world’s largest Christian university.

“Who would have thought sports and my faith would tie together?” Chierstin said. Despite her deliberate decision to blog about religion and sports, Chierstin admitted her getting a position that combined her interests exceeded anything she could have ever imagined. “I never really thought that I could tie the two together.”

Chierstin had initally created a fashion blog as an assignment during her sophomore year, but after the class ended, she took it down because it wasn’t something she was passionate about. (Now here’s the part of the story that completely surprised me … ) Apparently, Chierstin decided to start blogging again after she heard me speak in Tim’s class two years ago.

“It wasn’t until you came in and spoke about really branding yourself through a blog. That’s the only reason that I started it; it had nothing to do with an assignment,” Chierstin told me. “You had talked about starting a blog about something that you’re interested in. I had an interest in sports, but I didn’t know what I was going to pursue. And so at the time, (I thought) faith … always a big part of my life … I love fitness and fashion … so why not, you know? So I put it out there and started the blog.”

Chierstin started her dream job last week. You could say it was serendipity that led the hiring manager to her YouTube post and blog, but that would discount the critical thinking that went into her decisions – ones she made with her eyes wide open. Chierstin understood the importance of personal branding, the power of being authentic and the strategies for using the online tools that are available to all journalism students launching their careers, even when it’s not an assignment.

“It’s all a matter of just having yourself available and putting yourself out there – your reel and your resume and everything online digitally – so it’s really easy for people to find you.”

#ONA13 session recap: Building your professional brand with LinkedIn

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For the past four years, I’ve attended the Online News Association’s annual conference and sought out sessions that discussed branding for journalists. This year’s conference included a session dedicated to helping journalists create LinkedIn profiles that highlight their careers. (A companion LinkedIn for Journalists tutorial session focused on its value as a reporting tool.)

LinkedIn corporate communications manager Yumi Wilson opened the session with this Conan O’Brien bit that illustrated how some people still are unfamiliar with what the professional social network has to offer:

Of course, most of the journalists in the room already had LinkedIn profiles, and Yumi’s presentation focused on how they could maximize them with these steps:

  • Complete your profile 100% to earn “LinkedIn all-star” status: Adding content to your profile increases your profile strength. When you achieve expert or all-star status, you enable access to sharing your profile on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Write a zinger of a headline: Your headline shouldn’t be limited to your current job title. Instead, think about SEO for your headline and include all the keywords that express what you’d want a potential employer to know about you. It’s OK to write a 2-3 line headline that spans your career moves to reflect your brand as “the sum of your parts”.
  • Use your summary to be your best brand ambassador in the world: Write a few paragraphs about the work you do, your professional mission and your career goals.
  • Add websites to your profile: Use this space to link to your portfolio site or directly to specific stories you want to highlight.
  • Add content to the volunteer experiences & causes section: The organizations and efforts you support may seem irrelevant to your professional life, but they could lead to your being contacted about a project for which you are uniquely qualified.
  • Include a professional photo: In general, Yumi recommended a standard chest-and-above portrait for LinkedIn photos but also noted you can tailor your photo to the work you’re pursuing, i.e., a suit for an executive position, casual clothes for a tech job or an in-the-field/in-the-newsroom shot for a reporter or camera person.
  • Customize your public profile url (found below your photo on your profile): Changing your url to reference your name helps your LinkedIn profile come up first in search results.
  • Connect with colleagues, friends, alumni and clients:  Quality matters over quantity when it comes to LinkedIn connections. As few as 50 quality connections are sufficient for a strong network of second- and third-degree connections. According to this LinkedIn blog post about founder Reid Hoffman’s book The Start-Up of You, second- and third-degree connections are, in fact, the most effective sources of job opportunities:

Whether it is a former colleague, a business partner, a friend or a classmate, the connections in your network are all insiders at an organization with whom you may collaborate in the future.

  • Seek endorsements from first-degree connections: Endorsements reinforce and prioritize the skill package you self-report.
  • Invite connections to write recommendations for you: Recommendations go beyond endorsements by providing firsthand accounts of job performance and relationship skills. Make sure these recommendations come from a wide range of your connections rather than from one segment of your career.

After you’ve created a robust profile, you’re ready to join groupsfollow companies, channels and influencers and engage with the LinkedIn Today community.

You can follow @yumiwilson on Twitter and connect with her at www.linkedin.com/in/yumiwilson.

Resources for building your brand as a journalist

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When I speak with journalism students about their personal brands, I always stress they shouldn’t wait until they’re graduated to establish their online presences. Everything they need to share their bodies of work and begin distinguishing themselves within the profession is right at their fingertips. Seriously, it’s all there.

So where should they begin?

I’ve created a blog resources page that lists the links I provide students to get them started. It reflects my approach to personal branding for journalists:

  • Know yourself.
  • Know your goals and values.
  • Know how, where and to whom to communicate those qualities effectively.

Understanding your personality, skills, talents and life experiences allows you to make smart choices about where you fit in the newsroom.  If you can articulate your career goals and value system, you can target employers and opportunities to reflect them. Ultimately, the self-awareness you gain from defining your brand as a journalist will make it easier to authentically engage your audience, connect with colleagues and build trust with the public.

 

 

Written by Jennifer Gaie Hellum

October 11, 2013 at 3:08 am

Social Media One-Night Stand offers latest resources, supportive community for social media pros

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As a recent transplant into New York’s journalism community, I’m constantly keeping an eye out for opportunities to connect with other news and social media professionals. This is a huge media community, and breaking into it can be overwhelming. How does a new arrival find her people? Fortunately, New York has professional organizationsonline groupsmeet ups and conferences for journalists working in all areas and at all levels of the craft. As a journalist working in social media, I was excited to find Columbia University journalism professor Sree Sreenivasan’s Social Media One-Night Stand: An Advanced Workshop for Journalists, Bloggers & Media Professionals. This intensive, inexpensive way to learn about new online tools and connect with others doing similar work not only exposed me to valuable resources for updating my skills but also unexpectedly gave me a network of colleagues to get to know.

We're not rude; we're social media specialists.

Don’t worry, we’re not rude; we’re social media specialists. #cjsm (Photo by Jennifer Gaie Hellum)

For less than $150, attendees of the evening workshop saw a quick-paced lineup of presentations that ranged from tips from high-profile social media specialists to demonstrations of new tools and success stories from entrepreneurs:

We also got what felt like a social media pep rally from Sree, the event’s host. His boundless enthusiasm for social media showed as he appealed to us to share content – a lot of content.

Throughout the evening, Sree encouraged us to embrace the intimacy of social media, saying “This isn’t a flight; get up and walk around! Take pictures up close and share them on Instagram. Tweet what you’re learning. And make sure you include the hashtag #cjsm!” We were an obedient bunch, to put it mildly. Not only did we send hundreds of tweets with the presenters’ advice, we also shared Sree’s ad-libbed tips – and tagged them with #cjsm, of course: 25 Sree tips, as shared during the #cjsm Social Media One-Night Stand

  1. LinkedIn is highly underappreciated. Work on it. You are more than your job title. (via @redheadlefthand)
  2. Trying to learn LinkedIn once you’ve been laid off is too late. (via @dimitrakny)
  3. Keep and open mind but don’t let your brain fall out. (via @Manhattan_Mama)
  4. Practice social media skills when you don’t need them so they’re there when you do. (via @IlanaKowarski)
  5. If you can build a great quality product, the money will come later. Don’t think about your exit strategy. (via @soorajgera)
  6. Find the social media that works for you! (via @KapsSocial)
  7. Do something because you love it, not because you will make money doing it. (via  ‏@AudreyPadgett)
  8. Think of your social media sites as your embassies. Your website is your home. (via @AmyVernon; tip later attributed to @JimReynolds)
  9. Flipboard is the first social media I check early in the morning. (via @riotta)
  10. Social Media is a great way to amplify your message but takes effort and works best when you are passionate. (via @Manhattan_Mama)
  11. Be an early tester and late adopter of tech. (via @AndreaSmith)
  12. Add to your bucket list: work for a startup. (via @redheadlefthand)
  13. Laser-focus think about your brand. (via @CornichonP)
  14. Be careful about building your brand around your employer.  (via @redheadlefthand)
  15. For Twitter usernames, pick shortest possible, recognizable handle. Or at least memorable. (via @7SkiesTech
  16. Putting your employer’s name in your Twitter bio is like tattooing your boyfriend’s name on your arm. (via @IlanaKowarski)
  17. Use social media with a spirit of generosity. Give ppl useful info, and you will gain a following. (via @IlanaKowarski)
  18. Numbers aren’t everything. You can have a small # of followers and be doing great work on #socmedia. (via @IlanaKowarski)
  19. Embed codes are changing the world and we need to understand them. (via @esills)
  20. Every piece of content should be clickable, linkable, likable, shareable, embeddable. (via @JenniferPreston)
  21. If you’re good in real life, you can be great on Twitter. (via @ckanal, attributed to @ericaamerica)
  22. Your Twitter bio should reflect the best, current you. (via @AlexisGelber)
  23. The header photo on your Twitter profile is a great way to share something about yourself. Use it to highlight your brand. (via @jghellum)
  24. If you can’t add to the signal, don’t add to the noise. Add value when you post on Twitter. (via @JenniferPreston)
  25. Humility is important on social media. It comes across better than boasting.(via @IlanaKowarski)

In between presenters, Sree shifted from master of ceremonies to head cheerleader, as he spent the breaks giving shout-outs to industry leaders as well as attendees with success stories. Whether promoting the work they do or the paths they took to get there, he shared the stories of those on hand who had used social media to develop a niche, promote their brands and establish their careers. (These introductions continued to the very end of the evening, when he and a few dozen die-hard attendees gathered for late-night pizza nearby.)

And for those who ended the night perhaps overwhelmed by the tasks and responsibilities that go with being a social media specialist, Sree offered words of reassurance with this final, insightful slide:

 

News Foo 2012 curated highlights: popular tweets, photo summaries and post-Foo reflections

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Last week I had the very unexpected opportunity to attend the invitation-only annual journalism gathering called News Foo, which was hosted by O’Reilly Media at ASU’s Cronkite School. The three-day event included loosely structured “un-conference” sessions and two evenings of Ignite Talks (which hopefully will be posted online as they were last year.) Tim O’Reilly and his team brought together 150 brilliant, fearless innovators in technology and journalism (Friends Of O’Reilly, or FOO) who wouldn’t necessarily cross paths but nonetheless share the same goal of improving the way we create, distribute and consume news. He encouraged the attendees to put down their devices and actively participate, to reach out to folks they didn’t know and to attend sessions unrelated to their work. It truly was about getting out of one’s comfort zone and embracing intellectual stretch.

I can’t express how intimidating, inspiring and, frankly, inconceivable it was for me to be with this accomplished group of people. These creative, driven men and women are empowering journalists in conflict areas, crafting visual representations of data that elegantly express the outcomes of government policy and creating digital tools that change the way we tell stories. I left the event determined to figure out how I can rise to their level of knowledge and make a meaningful contribution to providing high quality, relevant information to society.

Although I wasn’t able to stay for the entire event, I did follow #NewsFoo tweets closely and read blog posts that followed. Here’s my curation of news, tweets, photos and posts about News Foo 2012.



News Foo 2012

NewsFoo brings together media professionals to discuss innovation

NewsFoo brings together media professionals to discuss innovation

December 3, 2012 · Downtown Devil · By Alexis Macklin

NewsFoo caps its number of invited attendees at 150 in order to bring the freshest ideas for the news industry back each year. (Alexis Macklin/DD) Heavy hitters in the news and technological industry conversed at the fourth annual NewsFoo Camp at the Walter Cronkite School this weekend. NewsFoo is an exclusive conference with a focus on innovation in news creation. The discussions are not planned until the participants arrive to provoke new …

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@TimOReilly kicking off #newsfoo by explaining the history of unconferences at O’Reilly Media. As usual, proud to work with and for him.

@TimOReilly kicking off #newsfoo by explaining the history of unconferences at O'Reilly Media. As usual, proud to work with and for him.

November 30, 2012 · Instagram ·

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The most retweeted #NewsFoo tweets: comments on Ignite Talks and un-conference sessions



 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 


Post-Foo blog posts: reflections, resources and a photo collection

#newsfoo 2012 highlights captured from afar

December 2, 2012 · The Linchpen 

NewsFoo just wrapped up its third event. I haven’t been since 2010, but I followed along on Twitter again this year. Below are some good bits from the unconference (in chronological order). [View the story "#newsfoo 2012 highlights" on Storify] #newsfoo 2012 highlights I wasn’t there, but I followed along on Twitter. Here were some awesome bits from the event (in chronological order). Storified by Greg Linch · Sun, Dec 02 2012 19:56:35 How do revolutions report on themselves? @BaghdadBrian …

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Thoughts (and some suggestions) on #NewsFoo: http://t.co/nqYKYLch

December 3, 2012 · Derek Willis

Thoughts (and some suggestions) on #NewsFoo: http://t.co/nqYKYLch

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 @A_L: I’ve never been to #newsfoo, but @derekwillis’ account is the most honest I’ve seen of the event yet. http://t.co/WQUOz4PO


 

Fine #newsfoo talk Sunday on keeping source identities safe, by Danny O’Brien of CPJ. Get the guide at http://t.co/AXDokH05

December 3, 2012 · Steve Doig 

Fine #newsfoo talk Sunday on keeping source identities safe, by Danny O’Brien of CPJ. Get the guide at http://t.co/AXDokH05

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Some Notes and Photos from NewsFoo

Some Notes and Photos from NewsFoo

December 3, 2012 · Hey Elise · by Elise Hu 

The spawn, the spouse and I just got back from NewsFoo, an unconference put on by O’Reilly Media and the Knight Foundation. The 150-ish attendees are all involved in technology and/or journalism in an interesting way and I’m certain I was the dumbest person there. If you’ve never unconferenced, the main idea is that at more traditional and scheduled conferences, all the best connections and interesting conversations end up happening at lunch or during coffee breaks. So unconferences …

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OMFG NewsFoo!

OMFG NewsFoo!

December 4, 2012 · oddletters.com · by molly

Sometime between the power outage Thursday night that left most of Cambridge in the dark and severely messed with my ability to construct my Ignite slide deck, and getting up at 5AM to catch a taxi to the airport, I started to have serious doubts about whether I should go to NewsFoo at all. Reading over the guest list (NewsFoo is a by-invitation conference) was an exercise in “Oh God, everyone …

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From #newsfoo: five opportunities for the news industry

From #newsfoo: five opportunities for the news industry

December 5, 2012 · Knight Foundation

It was a real pleasure to attend my first NewsFoo conference this past weekend. Sponsored by O’Reilly Media, Knight Foundation and Google, NewsFoo gathered a cross section of folks (read: rock stars) in the digital news space to talk about an agenda created on the spot. One of the most interesting …

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News Foo: What we learned, where we’re going

December 6, 2012 · knightlab.northwestern.edu

We wanted to take advantage of the great brains assembled at last week’s News Foo event, so we proposed a panel to suss out “big questions in journalism” that the lab should tackle. As might be expected from an unconference, the conversation ranged a lot more widely than our official topic. For starters, a number of folks had general questions about how the Lab works: Who are your stakeholders? Will your tools …

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“We need to put more digital designers into our news operations. I am talking about those visual…”

December 6, 2012 · Saila’s Miscellany

“We need to put more digital designers into our news operations. I am talking about those visual designers who can realize ideas and experiences into code because knowing how to write code helps produce better prototypes, and the best way to communicate an idea is through an interactive prototype. Producing quick prototypes brings ideas to life sooner, quickening the pace of decision making and software development … Ultimately helping Journalism respond faster to how quickly technology changes on the internet.” …

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Some sites/tools at @Newsfoo: http://t.co/IDwgtIfI #newsfoo

December 2, 2012 · Ryan Osborn

Some sites/tools at @Newsfoo: http://t.co/IDwgtIfI #newsfoo 

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Just posted a bunch of photos from #newsfoo – please help tagging, identifying peeps! https://t.co/pBcNseBT

NewsFoo 2012

Flickr · 32 photos | 135 views 

Items are from between 01 Dec 2012 & 03 Dec 2012. Subscribe to the set “NewsFoo 2012″ Grab the link: Here’s a link to this set. Just copy and paste! 

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Written by Jennifer Gaie Hellum

December 7, 2012 at 10:11 pm

#ONA12 personal-branding takeaway: First, claim your name

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During the three years I’ve been talking with journalists about branding, I’ve frequently been asked how I decide which social media platforms to be on. Every new social platform offers potential for generating stories, enhancing content or engaging the community, so how do I determine which ones will indeed be useful to me?

Of course, no one knows which tools will become staples and which will be forgotten, but that doesn’t mean you should wait before signing up when you hear about a new one. At this year’s Online News Organization conference in San Francisco, I heard what now will be one of my personal branding mantras for trying new tools:

First, claim your name.

I’ve always told journalists to purchase custom domain names for personal branding purposes after Dan Gillmor urged each of us grad students to buy our vanity URLs. But the “claim your name” approach also applies to experimenting with any online tool that might become part of your reporting arsenal.

In the session “Pinterest, Instagram, Google+: Keep Up, Keep Sane,” panelists NYU journalism professor Farai Chideya and Breaking News/NBC News Digital’s senior editor Stephanie Clary offered strategies for managing the many emerging digital resources for journalists. Both encouraged reporters to sign up when they hear about a new tool, dabble to gain a general understanding of its use and monitor how “superusers” take advantage of its unique reporting value.

 

Not only does checking out new platforms keep you familiar with emerging digital tools others are using, getting in early allows you to secure your username before someone else gets it. Usernames should signal identity, and for journalists, credibility and value. If you miss out on claiming your byline or something recognizably close to it, you miss opportunities to connect with your community.

In the session “#NOFILTER: How Social Photography Is Changing News and Journalism,” UC-Berkeley assistant professor Richard Koci Hernandez offered this classic example of the Los Angeles Times’ failure to secure its name on Instagram:

 

So grab your phone and claim your Instagram name before someone else does. Then make sure you’re at least signed up and ready to use these established digital platforms, creating custom URLs where available:

If you’ve tried out other platforms that you’ve found helpful, add them in the comments.

Written by Jennifer Gaie Hellum

September 26, 2012 at 1:27 am

Twitter boot camp: #TheRules (or #TheTips) for journalists

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I recently got a Twitter notification announcing my third anniversary as @jghellum. I joined Twitter in the summer of 2009 as the first assignment of my journalism grad school “boot camp.” Our cohort hashtag was #bc9, and it’s been fun watching the subsequent classes’ hashtags emerge each fall – the latest being #bcxii – as Cronkite school associate professor Leslie-Jean Thornton (@ljthornton) guides the aspiring journalists through the art of the well-crafted tweet.

When I saw a recent tweet from Fast Company soliciting Twitter best practices under the hashtag #TheRules, I thought of those aspiring journalists navigating a medium that doesn’t actually have written rules and trying to figure out how to use it professionally.

 

Many Twitter users offered helpful advice. However, some took exception to the use of #TheRules, defending the organic nature of how Twitter etiquette has emerged. I contributed several strategies of my own, and in a nod to the objections, adopted a less rigid (and perhaps less intimidating for newbies) hashtag, #TheTips:

 

Because Fast Company’s crowdsourced rules weren’t specifically geared toward journalists, I thought I’d share the effective tweet-crafting practices I learned during my Twitter boot camp, conventions I’ve picked up along the way and #TheTips I’ve shared with colleagues in the newsroom as they joined Twitter.

Best practices for getting started:
  1. Use your byline or a form of it as your Twitter handle. Each tweet is an opportunity for connecting with your audience. If they can’t connect your handle with your byline when you share worthwhile information, you’ve missed the opportunity to build relationships and become part of a community.
  2. Select a headshot, whether a candid or a studio photo, as your avatar. When your tweet shows up in other’s Twitter feeds, you want them to feel like you’re having a conversation, like you’re looking them in the eye and they can trust you.
  3. List your location and link to your blog, portfolio or LinkedIn account. Twitter is about connecting; provide opportunities for others to connect with you locally and online.
  4. Maximize your bio profile content to communicate your brand. Avoid generalizations and obscure references and instead list the qualities of your brand (your current position, unique experience and/or professional aspirations) that set you apart from other journalists and compel others to follow you.
Strategies for the well-crafted tweet:
  1. Write concisely. Use your 140-character limit to tighten up your writing. Use fewer than 140 to allow for easy retweeting.
  2. Avoid serial tweets. If you need more than three tweets to make a point, write a blog post instead. Series of tweets are difficult to RT; blog posts aren’t.
  3. Know the keywords related to your beat. Use Google Trends to compare terms and find those most frequently used to increase your tweet’s exposure beyond your followers.
  4. Use hashtags. They flag your tweet when the subject of your tweet isn’t part of your message.
  5. Learn the shorthand. Use RT when you retweet a message in its entirety; use MT if you’ve modified its content to the point of altering its message. If you create your own message based on information you learned in someone else’s tweet, credit them at the end with a HT (hat tip.)
  6. Monitor your Twitter page as a snapshot of your brand. When you follow others, they in turn will make a split-second decision of whether to follow you, based largely on your bio and most-recent tweets.
#TheTips for effective engagement:
  1. Engage your audience. Ask questions and respond to @mentions. Share links relevant to your beat and join conversations that are already happening.
  2. Always attribute tweets to the original source. It’s bad form to hijack shortened links posted by others and present them as you own.
  3. Avoid the #humblebrag. Presenting self-congratulatory news in a self-deprecating way looks desperate. Most people will see through it and some may question your sincerity.
  4. Don’t protect your tweets. If you’re there to engage your audience (why else be here?), don’t protect your tweets and prohibit interaction with the public.
  5. Take private conversations offline. Twitter is about sharing information at least some of your followers will find valuable. If no one else gets it, send DMs instead.
  6. Play nice. When engaging in a discussion on Twitter, be a good listener and be professional. No one likes a bully, and any tweet can be captured in a screen grab.
Best of luck to #bcxii and all the veteran journalists who are just now jumping into the Twitterverse. If you have Twitter tips to offer journalists, add them in the comments.

Written by Jennifer Gaie Hellum

September 17, 2012 at 7:14 am