Brand Me a Journalist

Using Social Media to Create a Professional Niche

Dan Schawbel’s personal branding advice to journalism students

with 3 comments

Each week, the Cronkite School hosts well-known journalists and accomplished authors as part of their Must See Monday lecture series for students. I was thrilled to see that among this fall’s lineup was personal branding expert Dan Schawbel.

I had the opportunity to interview Dan via email for a blog post last spring and looked forward to meeting him in person. He proved to be a tireless ambassador of personal branding, spending the day lecturing to classes, meeting with faculty and engaging anyone interested in harnessing their unique brand.

Dan’s presentation centered mostly on his new book, “Me 2.0: Four Steps to Building Your Future.” Much of his advice addressed strategies for defining career goals and communicating them effectively to find professional success. For aspiring journalists, the strategies are particularly relevant as our field gets more fragmented and less defined. The faceless employee of the legacy news organization has given way to the journalist as his own brand. He started by describing the deconstructed job market we’re in that has put us in charge of our professional fates:

The internet has forced us to become marketers, the economy has forced us to become experts and the recruitment system has forced us to become networkers.

That means we are ultimately responsible for managing how desirable, competent and relevant we appear online. So how do we do that?

The Four-Step Personal Branding Process

 

Dan’s strategic plan for creating a strong personal brand requires us to proactively evaluate what we want and go after it aggressively.

 

Discover: What’s your niche? To say you want to be the next Katie Couric or Brian Williams isn’t a strategic as deciding you’re going to be the best-informed multimedia journalist focusing on Arizona business news. (Or, let’s say, personal branding for aspiring journalists.) One of the most effective exercises in journalism schools today is requiring students to choose blog topics and cover them for a semester. Our passions and talents instinctively surface and help us direct our effort toward areas that engage us, and, as a result, engage our audiences. Choose the area where you can use your life experiences and personality to enhance your expertise, making you an indispensable voice on that topic.

Create: Your portfolio, blog, email signature, business card and resume all are in your toolkit. These are the virtual representations of the professional you want to be. Along with your social media profiles on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn, they’re the assets that your colleagues, network and potential employers see. These elements should be professional, customized and visually compatible. Above all, they should authentically represent who you are in person.

Communicate: Use online tools to get your name and your work out there on a consistent basis. Be strategic with who you connect with. This is not using people; it’s associating with people who inspire you and who can make you more effective at the work you do. By contributing to the conversations taking place on Twitter, Facebook, blogs and news comment sections, you’re creating a digital footprint in the environment where you want to grow your expertise. Networking events like conferences, meet-ups and online chats offer opportunities to develop relationships that can lead to personal references and online endorsements.

Maintain: Consistently cultivate your search presence. Monitor your Google hits for both positive and negative press. When you’re praised, promote it with sincerity. And if you find you’ve received negative comments or been referenced in an undesirable way by friends or colleagues, address it directly and do what you can to suppress it in search or eliminate it.

Afterthought

I wondered how many of the underclassmen in the audience understood the implications of personal branding in light of the openness they embrace with their online identities. Dan emphasized that 80% of employers use social networks for background checks. Managing your online reputation is an ongoing responsibility. The reality is your “digital dirt” stays with you, and it’s up to you minimize its effect on your career.

Written by Jennifer Gaie Hellum

October 14, 2010 at 9:34 pm

3 Responses

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  1. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by ljthornton, ljthornton, Dr. Bill Silcock, Nicole Lavella, Nicole Lavella and others. Nicole Lavella said: RT @drbillasu: Excellent post by Jen Hellum on Dan #Schawbel’s Personal Branding Advice to Journalism Students http://bit.ly/bto39t […]

  2. Thanks Jennifer and it was great meeting you.

    Dan Schawbel

    October 15, 2010 at 1:35 pm

  3. Loved the post, Jennifer. I was at an orientation and was told one thing that I never forgot: “A logo is a promise.” And by extension, our brand is a promise to our readers, viewers, listeners. Do we deliver on our promise?

    Please keep these awesome posts coming.

    Steve

    October 16, 2010 at 12:17 am


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