Brand Me a Journalist

Using Social Media to Create a Professional Niche

Personal Branding Expert Dan Schawbel on Why Journalists Should Care about Their Personal Brands

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I’ve been blogging about how journalists can build their personal brands with social media for the past semester. Although I’ve profiled several journalists and their personal brands, I realized that I haven’t sought the advice of a personal branding expert. An earlier post featured the definitive article written about personal branding by Tom Peters; in fact, the next generation’s personal branding guru Dan Schawbel, author of Me 2.0, cites that article for inspiring his career.

I emailed Dan recently to discuss how he found his niche and built his personal brand. Make sure you click the link below; his story is an inspiration and a blueprint for how you can change your life by pursuing your dream–with passion, with hard work, and with a strategy.

My thanks to Dan for giving this rookie blogger and journalist his time and insights; I plan to take his advice very soon. (Stay tuned…)

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Jennifer Gaie Hellum: Your degree is in marketing and IT and you spent much of your early career doing marketing and PR. How did you get interested in personal branding?

Dan Schawbel: Here is the complete story:

http://www.personalbrandingblog.com/my-story-from-nobody-to-brand-name-entrepreneur-in-under-3-years.

 

Jennifer: What made you decide to start blogging? Did you do it specifically to create your own personal brand or out of an interest in personal branding?

 

Dan: I started a blog in 2006 to help students get internships and help them learn from my triumphs during college, where I had eight internships, seven leadership positions and my own company. I then read Tom Peter’s The Brand Called You article in Fast Company, and it was my calling. I started my blog that night and haven’t looked back. My personal brand is personal branding, correct.  It wasn’t as intentional as it seems. It was a natural progression from middle school.

Jennifer: You’re a blogger, a writer and a publisher. Do you consider yourself a journalist?

Dan: Yes, and no. I don’t abide by the traditional journalism rules for the most part. I have two blogs, a magazine, and two columns in mainstream media (BusinessWeek and Metro). All of these platforms are flexible and I can basically write anything about personal branding I so choose. A journalist that is hired by a company has to cover a certain beat, from a certain location, and has to run everything by his or her editor for approval. If you get paid to write articles, there are more corporate obstacles you have to run through to get published.

Jennifer: Why should journalists care about personal branding?

Dan: The media landscape is changing and a lot of journalists are losing their jobs and being left with nothing. By developing a personal brand, you’re protecting yourself from a layoff. Journalists should create their own blog, with a list of articles they have had published and links to them. They should also write original content on their blog, so they can become part of the online community, be a valuable contributor, and grow an audience to help boost their careers.

Journalists, unlike most people, are already visible so they have the clear advantage. For instance, a journalist that works for Men’s Health or Vogue will already have a leg up on others that don’t have that credibility. The key is knowing how to leverage other platforms (in this case, the magazines) to your own benefit.

You need to have a website and use other media to promote it, because at the end of the day, your website or blog is your only asset. You can get laid off tomorrow and have nothing if you don’t protect yourself. Also, journalists are being expected to not just write content, but to promote it. More and more journalists are being paid based on pageviews, so if you don’t have platform, you won’t make much money.

Jennifer: What social media tools, beyond Twitter and blogging, should journalists be using to promote their brands?

Dan: There is actually a really popular social network for journalists called Wired Journalists (http://www.wiredjournalists.com). It’s based on the Ning.com architecture. Other than that, I think journalists should get serious about video because it’s slowly becoming part of the job description, so I would resort to using YouTube and other video sharing sites for practice at a minimum. Blogging is by far the most important thing you can do as a journalist, and almost every mainstream media site has blogs now, so you should take advantage of those opportunities. Then there’s LinkedIn and Facebook, but they are a bit less relevant to journalists in my opinion.

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Dan Schawbel, recognized as a “personal branding guru” by The New York Times, is the Managing Partner of Millennial Branding, LLC, and the leading authority on personal branding. He is the author of the #1 international bestselling book, Me 2.0. Dan is the founder of the Personal Branding Blog®, the publisher of Personal Branding Magazine®and the Student Branding Blog, head judge for the Personal Brand Awards®, director ofPersonal Branding TV®, and holds live Personal Branding Events.

3 Responses

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  1. Great post. I think he hit it on the head with this one: “By developing a personal brand, you’re protecting yourself from a layoff.” That’s so important now for journalists, particularly since so many of us are out of work.

    Alexis Grant

    May 8, 2010 at 9:15 am

  2. […] had the opportunity to interview Dan via email for a blog post last spring and looked forward to meeting him in person. He proved to be a tireless ambassador of personal […]


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