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Using Social Media to Create a Professional Niche

Posts Tagged ‘LinkedIn All-star status

#ONA13 session recap: Building your professional brand with LinkedIn

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For the past four years, I’ve attended the Online News Association’s annual conference and sought out sessions that discussed branding for journalists. This year’s conference included a session dedicated to helping journalists create LinkedIn profiles that highlight their careers. (A companion LinkedIn for Journalists tutorial session focused on its value as a reporting tool.)

LinkedIn corporate communications manager Yumi Wilson opened the session with this Conan O’Brien bit that illustrated how some people still are unfamiliar with what the professional social network has to offer:

Of course, most of the journalists in the room already had LinkedIn profiles, and Yumi’s presentation focused on how they could maximize them with these steps:

  • Complete your profile 100% to earn “LinkedIn all-star” status: Adding content to your profile increases your profile strength. When you achieve expert or all-star status, you enable access to sharing your profile on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Write a zinger of a headline: Your headline shouldn’t be limited to your current job title. Instead, think about SEO for your headline and include all the keywords that express what you’d want a potential employer to know about you. It’s OK to write a 2-3 line headline that spans your career moves to reflect your brand as “the sum of your parts”.
  • Use your summary to be your best brand ambassador in the world: Write a few paragraphs about the work you do, your professional mission and your career goals.
  • Add websites to your profile: Use this space to link to your portfolio site or directly to specific stories you want to highlight.
  • Add content to the volunteer experiences & causes section: The organizations and efforts you support may seem irrelevant to your professional life, but they could lead to your being contacted about a project for which you are uniquely qualified.
  • Include a professional photo: In general, Yumi recommended a standard chest-and-above portrait for LinkedIn photos but also noted you can tailor your photo to the work you’re pursuing, i.e., a suit for an executive position, casual clothes for a tech job or an in-the-field/in-the-newsroom shot for a reporter or camera person.
  • Customize your public profile url (found below your photo on your profile): Changing your url to reference your name helps your LinkedIn profile come up first in search results.
  • Connect with colleagues, friends, alumni and clients:  Quality matters over quantity when it comes to LinkedIn connections. As few as 50 quality connections are sufficient for a strong network of second- and third-degree connections. According to this LinkedIn blog post about founder Reid Hoffman’s book The Start-Up of You, second- and third-degree connections are, in fact, the most effective sources of job opportunities:

Whether it is a former colleague, a business partner, a friend or a classmate, the connections in your network are all insiders at an organization with whom you may collaborate in the future.

  • Seek endorsements from first-degree connections: Endorsements reinforce and prioritize the skill package you self-report.
  • Invite connections to write recommendations for you: Recommendations go beyond endorsements by providing firsthand accounts of job performance and relationship skills. Make sure these recommendations come from a wide range of your connections rather than from one segment of your career.

After you’ve created a robust profile, you’re ready to join groupsfollow companies, channels and influencers and engage with the LinkedIn Today community.

You can follow @yumiwilson on Twitter and connect with her at www.linkedin.com/in/yumiwilson.