Brand Me a Journalist

Using Social Media to Create a Professional Niche

Posts Tagged ‘Tom Peters

Personal Branding Expert Dan Schawbel on Why Journalists Should Care about Their Personal Brands

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I’ve been blogging about how journalists can build their personal brands with social media for the past semester. Although I’ve profiled several journalists and their personal brands, I realized that I haven’t sought the advice of a personal branding expert. An earlier post featured the definitive article written about personal branding by Tom Peters; in fact, the next generation’s personal branding guru Dan Schawbel, author of Me 2.0, cites that article for inspiring his career.

I emailed Dan recently to discuss how he found his niche and built his personal brand. Make sure you click the link below; his story is an inspiration and a blueprint for how you can change your life by pursuing your dream–with passion, with hard work, and with a strategy.

My thanks to Dan for giving this rookie blogger and journalist his time and insights; I plan to take his advice very soon. (Stay tuned…)

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Jennifer Gaie Hellum: Your degree is in marketing and IT and you spent much of your early career doing marketing and PR. How did you get interested in personal branding?

Dan Schawbel: Here is the complete story:

http://www.personalbrandingblog.com/my-story-from-nobody-to-brand-name-entrepreneur-in-under-3-years.

 

Jennifer: What made you decide to start blogging? Did you do it specifically to create your own personal brand or out of an interest in personal branding?

 

Dan: I started a blog in 2006 to help students get internships and help them learn from my triumphs during college, where I had eight internships, seven leadership positions and my own company. I then read Tom Peter’s The Brand Called You article in Fast Company, and it was my calling. I started my blog that night and haven’t looked back. My personal brand is personal branding, correct.  It wasn’t as intentional as it seems. It was a natural progression from middle school.

Jennifer: You’re a blogger, a writer and a publisher. Do you consider yourself a journalist?

Dan: Yes, and no. I don’t abide by the traditional journalism rules for the most part. I have two blogs, a magazine, and two columns in mainstream media (BusinessWeek and Metro). All of these platforms are flexible and I can basically write anything about personal branding I so choose. A journalist that is hired by a company has to cover a certain beat, from a certain location, and has to run everything by his or her editor for approval. If you get paid to write articles, there are more corporate obstacles you have to run through to get published.

Jennifer: Why should journalists care about personal branding?

Dan: The media landscape is changing and a lot of journalists are losing their jobs and being left with nothing. By developing a personal brand, you’re protecting yourself from a layoff. Journalists should create their own blog, with a list of articles they have had published and links to them. They should also write original content on their blog, so they can become part of the online community, be a valuable contributor, and grow an audience to help boost their careers.

Journalists, unlike most people, are already visible so they have the clear advantage. For instance, a journalist that works for Men’s Health or Vogue will already have a leg up on others that don’t have that credibility. The key is knowing how to leverage other platforms (in this case, the magazines) to your own benefit.

You need to have a website and use other media to promote it, because at the end of the day, your website or blog is your only asset. You can get laid off tomorrow and have nothing if you don’t protect yourself. Also, journalists are being expected to not just write content, but to promote it. More and more journalists are being paid based on pageviews, so if you don’t have platform, you won’t make much money.

Jennifer: What social media tools, beyond Twitter and blogging, should journalists be using to promote their brands?

Dan: There is actually a really popular social network for journalists called Wired Journalists (http://www.wiredjournalists.com). It’s based on the Ning.com architecture. Other than that, I think journalists should get serious about video because it’s slowly becoming part of the job description, so I would resort to using YouTube and other video sharing sites for practice at a minimum. Blogging is by far the most important thing you can do as a journalist, and almost every mainstream media site has blogs now, so you should take advantage of those opportunities. Then there’s LinkedIn and Facebook, but they are a bit less relevant to journalists in my opinion.

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Dan Schawbel, recognized as a “personal branding guru” by The New York Times, is the Managing Partner of Millennial Branding, LLC, and the leading authority on personal branding. He is the author of the #1 international bestselling book, Me 2.0. Dan is the founder of the Personal Branding Blog®, the publisher of Personal Branding Magazine®and the Student Branding Blog, head judge for the Personal Brand Awards®, director ofPersonal Branding TV®, and holds live Personal Branding Events.

A Nod to Tom Peters' definitive article: "The Brand Called You"

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Whenever I do Google searches to generate blog post topics on building your personal brand, I invariably come across blogs that mention Tom Peters‘ 1997 article in Fast Company entitled “The Brand Called You.” I remember reading his book “In Search of Excellence” for an undergrad public relations class in 1988, which is ironic to me because sometimes I feel like this blog is more about PR than it is about journalism. But I guess that’s the point: journalists in growing numbers are becoming solely responsible for promoting their work as jobs are eliminated.

And it seems as though Tom Peters saw this coming way before the news industry was ready (or willing) to hear it. Although he references the Net, your Rolodex and beepers, much of what he had to say about taking control of your professional identity in 1997 sounds as fresh and as urgent today as it did then:

“The good news — and it is largely good news — is that everyone has a chance to stand out. Everyone has a chance to learn, improve, and build up their skills. Everyone has a chance to be a brand worthy of remark.”

To think he felt such certainty of professional manifest destiny before the web’s power was fully realized, before web 2.0 and the era of “Have Blog, Will Prosper.” (From the recent dates of the comments, it’s clear others find his ideas to be timely, too.)

Check out his challenges and calls to action and consider what you’re doing to define your journalistic brand, but read them while keeping in mind all the powerful ways social media can help you the achieve them.

“What makes you different?” Can you define it in 15 words or less, as he suggests, or within the limits of a Twitter profile? Have you crafted a personal tagline for your personal web site and portfolio? Are you using social media to define your professional niche, through the tweets you send and the comments you leave? Have you found others with similar interests and connected with them through LinkedIn, Facebook or Twitter?

“What’s the pitch for you?” Are you using social media to increase your web presence in a way that’s consistent with your brand? Do your tweets, Facebook posts, Flickr streams or blog posts betray the image your wish to portray? Do they target the kind of work you want to do?

“What’s the real power of you?” How are you increasing your credibility? Are you leaving comments on blogs? Do you participate in live chats? Do you make references in your blog to relevant work you admire?

“What’s loyalty to you?” Are you using social media to create a following of readers and colleagues to engage in conversations? Not only do social media offer opportunities to express your brand identity, they also have become essential for researching stories and finding sources.

“What’s the future of you?” Have you created a strategy for where you want your career to go? Are you making contacts with people at those organizations and staying informed about them and their careers?

As the “CEO of You” in the digital age, the corporate ladder of you is in fact a series of links and clicks, all at YOUR fingertips.

http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/10/brandyou.html