Brand Me a Journalist

Using Social Media to Create a Professional Niche

Posts Tagged ‘Twitter

How journalists’ personal brands enhance community engagement

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I just returned from the Online News Association’s annual conference in Washington, DC, where I had the opportunity to hear industry leaders discuss technology and trends that are shaping the future of online news. The subject of personal branding unexpectedly came up during a session about news organizations’ engagement policies when NPR ombudsman Alicia Shepard posed the following question:

In lean newsrooms, how do you get reporters to get involved in comment moderation?

Jeff Hidek, community engagement editor for the Wilmington StarNews’ StarNewsonline.com, responded that the paper’s reporters became invested in moderating their comments after focus group findings revealed how significantly readers paid attention to reporters’ bylines and social media accounts.

I talked to Jeff after the session to find out more about how the reporters’ personal brands influenced their readers’ loyalty. He said although the focus groups’ purpose had been to address general topics about the paper and its website rather than its reporters, the most insightful finding came when they asked the readers what would make them read a story that they wouldn’t normally read.

“The most consistent comment was ‘because I follow Shelby (Sebens) on Twitter‘ or ‘I’m going to read any story by Si (Cantwell) because he comes out to our community and cares about what we say,’” Jeff said.

Consequently, the focus group results gave the reporters a heightened awareness of and greater appreciation for their readers’ loyalty, which made them more interested in participating in the comments. It also gave them more leverage in pitching stories to their editors.

“What a great way to connect to say thanks for reading,” Jeff said. “And at the same time, by reading things like ‘I always read anything Shelby writes’ (reporters) found they now could go to their editors and say, ‘Let me write this; I know they’ll read it.'”

He added that by harnessing social media to develop their brands, the reporters not only strengthened their readerships but also grew their pool of sources. For example, Shelby started a blog for her beat and became even more closely identified with her Brunswick County reporter brand. When she later handed off the beat to another reporter, he inherited a loyal base while she retained her readers as she became the city government reporter. Jeff also helped the paper’s film reporter Amy Hotz create a Ning social network page called Wilm on Film to access people who worked in Wilmingtons’s film industry.

“Now any time Amy has a question, instead of paging through the regional film commission’s directory for sources, she posts it on Facebook, Twitter and wilmonfilm.com and has four sources in no time.”

Since taking on the position of community engagement editor (in addition to being the paper’s TV critic), Jeff has been in charge of streamlining the paper’s social media policies and accounts and developing curation guidelines for the reporters’ individual accounts. These guidelines include that reporters commit to regularly moderating comments and posting on their social media accounts.

He also acts as a newsroom liaison to the paper’s marketing department as reporters’ personal brands take a greater role in the paper’s overall marketing strategy. He said there’s been no pushback from management against emphasis on reporters’ brands because they know that what’s good for the reporter is good for them. In fact, management has committed to doing a branding campaign focused on its reporters similar to those done by television news programs.

“They recognize that everyone at the paper is a representation of the paper,” Jeff said. “It’s great that we have a brand as a paper and as site, but it’s more than that; we want people to see us as part of the community – because we are part of the community.”

To Follow or to be Followed: Building Your Twitter Network

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(This is the fourth of 30 posts referring to 10,000 Words’ 30 Things Journalism Grads Should Do This Summer, as I work my way down the list of recommended digital media tasks.)

Before I started graduate school, the idea of using Twitter seemed narcissistic to me. I quickly recognized, however, what a powerful tool Twitter could be when used stategically. Whether for breaking news or industry-related topics, Twitter provides immediate access to conversations taking place among journalists about newsgathering and the future of journalism. In the Twittersphere, we’re all invited to participate in the discussion.

The next social media challenge on the 10,000 Words to-do list involves using Twitter to increase your exposure in the journalism community:

Task #4: Friend at least 50 journalists on Twitter who in turn follow you back.

Although I’ve been using Twitter primarily for career-related purposes, I hadn’t stopped to assess exactly how many of my followers are journalists. This task made me wonder how I was going to get TV reporters and newspaper columnists to follow an unknown grad student. My only strategy was to start following them and hope they’d find my Twitter profile interesting enough to start following me back.

But luckily for me, Albany, NY-based journalist Alexis Grant saw my promo of this task at the foot of my last post and left me a twitterific gift before I’d even begun the challenge:

… I’ve got a good list of journos on Twitter who I think represent the future of the industry… http://twitter.com/alexisgrant/journfuture/members

That was the paradigm shift I needed. Her list of journalists in traditional and online media not only opened my eyes to the value of Twitter lists as a resource, but it also reminded me that today’s journalism community is a dynamic group of professionals with a diverse range of job descriptions. Of course I could get journalists to follow me; they already had. I’ve been communicating with web journalists, online news editors, social media editors, multimedia journalism professors, students–and yes, even some good ol’ reporters– for the past year. I’ve never met Alexis Grant, but she is one of the 100+ journalists I have followed who reciprocally have followed me (or visa versa).

So this task is that easy, right? Just go to a journalist’s Twitter page and look at their lists for groups of people in the business. In fact, it’s not that easy. That’s sure to provide you many people to follow, but that’s only part of this challenge. You need to get followed in return. Here’s what I’ve learned about the politics of following and being followed over the past year.

Why would a journalist on Twitter want to follow me?

Before you begin to follow others on Twitter, you first need to establish a Twitter profile of your own that will compel others to follow you. When I get an email notice saying someone is following me only to find that my new follower has no profile bio statement, web link or even a location, I usually don’t follow back. Same goes for those with less than a full page of tweets or single-digit “following” stats. Having few followers isn’t an immediate turnoff for me; everybody has to start somewhere. The red flag more often is when someone only has a few sporadic tweets, which tells me this person is not an active Twitter user.

Before you start going crazy clicking people’s follow buttons and hoping they’ll follow you back, take some time to increase your chance of getting followed by creating a tweet history.

What do I say if don’t have any followers?

It may feel strange sending tweets to no one. But by spending at least a few days filling your Twitter profile page with 15-20 tweets before you start following people, you’ll give those people something to look at when they receive the follow notification.

  1. Fill out your profile. People want to know who you are. Use your professional name as your Twitter ID and include your photo and location. If possible, use the web section to link to your blog, portfolio page, Google profile or any other site that will provide more information about you. Use the bio section to identify your employer or share your career goals, interests or personality.
  2. Consider your personal brand and how you want to present yourself to the world. Think about the digital profile you want to establish and send tweets that speak to your career niche with an authentic voice. The Personal Branding Blog has a practical checklist that offers a strategy for getting started on tweeting. Keep it on hand for when you don’t know what to say and want to say something of value.
  3. Use keywords relevant to your niche. Writing a well-crafted tweet increases the chance it will be seen. For example, a tweet and a link from a blogger who writes about immigration issues in Arizona that reads “Here’s my new post” will not show up in searches. On the other hand, “Here’s my new post about immigration issues in Arizona” will go to anyone following the keywords “immigration” or “Arizona”.
  4. Include hashtags. Hashtags are keywords, phrases or abbreviations preceded by #. They’re used as a kind of shorthand to indicate topics or events. For example, #ona is used for the Online News Association. If you’re writing a tweet related to ONA that doesn’t mention it specifically, adding the hashtag #ona to the end of the tweet flags it for anyone specifically following that hashtag (but not necessarily following you). Note the hashtags being used by journalists and look them up in a hashtag directory such as tagdef.com.
  5. Retweet links, comments and observations that you find valuable. A retweet, or RT, is how you share something someone else found interesting enough to send in a tweet.  Retweeting gives them credit for the content of their tweet while allowing you to add your input.
  6. Send a response to a comment or question. If you think you have something to add to the conversation, jump in. But remember, Facebook is like having a conversation with friends in your living room, while Twitter is more like a conversation with acquaintances at a business function or cocktail reception.

Ask yourself, “Are these tweets something of value? Are they, on the whole, rich with relevant career-related content and commentary?”  If you have a full page of tweets that give a sense of who you are as a journalist, then you’re ready to start building your “following” list.

How do I find journalists to follow on Twitter who will in turn follow me?

This process may sound like a popularity contest to the cynical person (there are a few in journalism), but  in a very real sense it’s a credibility contest, a professional-value contest and an authority contest.

  1. Use Google search instead of Twitter to find people. Don’t rely on the Twitter “Search” or “Find People” functions to locate people or organizations using Twitter. I’ve had much greater success using Google by searching the name followed by “on Twitter”. For example, “Scott Simon on Twitter” will bring up several Twitter accounts with the name Scott Simon, but you can easily see that NPR’s host of Weekend Edition sends tweets using @nprscottsimon.
  2. Begin by following news organizations, journalism schools, and professional organizations such as the Society of Professional Journalists. This will start your base “following” activity. Look at who else is following these organizations, as well as whom they find valuable enough to follow.
  3. Add the people you know in the business. Look up colleagues, classmates, professors or acquaintances. They are likely to follow you back, giving you a base of “followers” before you add people you don’t know.
  4. Find the individual journalists associated with publications or organizations you respect. This is the beauty of Twitter. As I wrote in an earlier post,  we now are just one degree of separation from the veterans of the craft.
  5. Look at whom they follow and check out their “lists”. If they follow a large number of people, it may be easier to look at their lists rather than each individual. Do they have a specific group of journalists they follow? Have they themselves been “listed”?  This means someone has grouped them within a category of similar Twitter users, which could include lists of journalists.
  6. Do a google search for lists of journalists to follow on Twitter. Many journalism blogs, such as muckrack.com, 10,000 Words and SPJ, have put together lists of prominent journalists on Twitter. Chances are these people have many followers, which could lessen your chance of being followed by them, but consider following them anyway.
  7. Participate in Twitter chats. Each week, groups of journalists gather online for Twitter chats with specific topics. Check out chats such as PoynterOnline#wjchat, #cjchat#journchat and #pubmedia to find journalists in your niche.
  8. Watch to see who gets recommended on “Follow Fridays”. The hashtag #ff is used in a tweet when someone is recommending another Twitter user. Set aside time on Fridays to see who is being recommended by other journalists.

Lastly, when you do get followed by a fellow journalist, consider it being handed a digital business card and send a tweet saying thanks for the follow.

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Next up: Task #5: Become a part of a crowdsourcing project. (I submitted my Facebook photo for the crowdsourced TIME magazine cover, but I don’t think that counts as journalism…)

Written by Jennifer Gaie Hellum

July 26, 2010 at 11:04 am

Adventures in Retweets: My 48 Hours as an International Blogging Sensation

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(This is the second of 30 posts referring to 10,000 Words’ 30 Things Journalism Grads Should Do This Summer, as I work my way down the list of recommended digital media tasks.)

After a two-month hiatus from blogging, I was pleased to see the enthusiastic response to my return post as I announced my effort to tackle the ambitious 10,000 Words to-do list. I got an encouraging amount of blog traffic and a pair of comments, including votes of confidence from a journalism professor and from the list’s author himself.

I didn’t, however, accomplish the next task on the list:

Task #2: If you already have a blog, write a post that gets retweeted 20 times.

No, although the retweets I got were highly appreciated ones from a few high-profile journalists, they totaled a humbling three retweets. I’m hopeful the number will increase as I share my successes, failures, obstacles and reflections, but for now I’ll have to focus this post on my only experience of getting retweeted more than 20 times.

Over two exhilarating days last May, a tweet announcing a blog post of mine went out to my 100+ followers, got retweeted by a few of my professors and found its way to a Peruvian journalist with a gift for translation and a large international following. Here’s how I related the incident to my professor Dan Gillmor the following day:

I have to thank you for the RT yesterday. You set off a cascade of RTs, which included a Peruvian journalist who translated my post and credited me by name. It’s been re-tweeted from her site 100 times and posted on FB 30 times, and I’m suddenly being followed by dozens of South American journos. (Fortunately, I speak Spanish well enough to understand what’s being said by them.) … I ended the day with 956 hits on my blog and another 250+ today. Crazy. So much for a blog wrap-up; I think I’ll keep writing it for a while.

Ironically, the post was supposed to be the conclusion to this blog, an end-of-semester reflection on what I had learned while blogging 2-3 times a week for Dan and CJ Cornell’s Digital Media Entrepreneurship class.

To what do I credit this unexpected level of response to my blog, which during the semester had only twice received more than 100 hits in a day? In fact, in covering the social media/personal branding beat, I noticed a few things about retweeted tweets:

  1. Enumerated lists catch people’s eyes. Like those on magazine cover blurbs, lists of tips, suggestions and other actionable tasks appeal to people’s desire for advice and measurable results.
  2. Tweets posted during the workday get noticed more than those posted at 2 a.m. (when I often finished writing my posts). Even though Twitter users have applications like TweetDeck and Seesmic for managing tweets, I’ve found the tweets that trickle in during the day get more individual attention than the dozens waiting for me when I check it in the morning.
  3. Well-crafted tweets, laden with relevant keywords and IDs of other Twitter users, will get retweeted by people other than your followers.

I decided to test my first theory on my final post, hoping for maximum traffic to my student blog. I set out to write a top-ten list and eventually ended up with a collection of tips: 12 Tips for Journalists: My Semester on the Personal Branding Beat. I then, as always, posted a tweet, making sure to use essential keywords such as “social media”,” journalists” and “personal branding” (note the time stamp):

I went to bed pleased with my list strategy and woke only to be disappointed by the lack of response. I had worked hard on this post, highlighting the skills I’d gained and the interviews I’d conducted. I’d even managed to reference one of my digital media heroes, Mignon Fogarty (aka Grammar Girl)– although I’d failed at embedding her podcast. But later in the day, she provided the necessary code, and I retweeted the revised posts to signal to her that I’d successfully added it. This gave me the opportunity to test out my second theory, and I re-sent my tweet 12 hours after I originally posted it:

Within minutes, a few of my professors at Cronkite retweeted the link and sent direct messages saying they liked the post. They had missed the early-morning tweet completely. (It was finals week for all of us.) Fortunately for me, my professors are highly regarded in journalism nationally and, apparently, internationally. Peruvian digital journalist Esther Vargas, founder of Clasesdeperiodismo.com, an online digital journalism school for Latin American, saw the tweet and translated the entire blog post into Spanish:

From there, things truly became viral. In addition to the 50 retweets of my original tweet, readers of her blog from all corners of Central and South America, as well as Europe, responded by sending retweets and posting links on Facebook. My sons and I giggled as my hits climbed past 100, passed 500 and topped out near 1,000 in a day.

OK, my viral adventure may not have made me an international blogging sensation, but it did show me how powerful Twitter can be when used effectively. (An added benefit: I now get to read Spanish-language “tuits” from my new periodismo friends from around the world.)

—–

Next up: Task #3: Shoot 100 amazing photos and post them on Flickr. (This one will be fun. I got a new digital SLR for Mother’s Day– apparently just in time!)

Written by Jennifer Gaie Hellum

July 11, 2010 at 11:56 pm

12 Tips for Journalists: My Semester on the Personal Branding Beat

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When Dan Gillmor assigned our digital media entrepreneurship class the task of blogging for the semester, he challenged each of us to “become an expert on a digital media topic”. He assured us that by blogging “2-3 times a week, at 300-500 words per post”, we would know more than enough about our topics to confidently own our chosen beats.

I have to say that at the time that outcome seemed pretty unrealistic to me. I began this blog about personal branding and social media with a basic understanding of the issue’s relevance to journalists:

How we manage our online identities as journalists is increasingly more important as the news industry goes through revolutionary change. Journalism school grads no longer have to accept the traditional employment path of starting in a small market with hopes of making it to a legacy organization someday. Instead, entrepreneurial journalists are strategically defining themselves through social media and niche specializations to set themselves apart from their peers, develop relationships and create their own opportunities.

After following other bloggers, interviewing journalists and watching Twitter feeds daily, I’m amazed by how much I’ve learned about this subject. I’m now convinced that journalists must learn to effectively use social media to develop a niche and a personal brand, and I feel comfortable discussing the tools to do so.

Therefore, in the style of many of the most re-tweeted posts about social media and branding, here are my Top 12 Tips for Journalists on Using Social Media to Develop a Personal Brand:

1. Find your niche. Consider your unique talents, interests and personal network and identify a topic you can own. Look for news coverage that make you think “why isn’t someone covering this more?” and investigate what has been written about it in the past. Whether you recognize a neglected topic, feel passionate about a beat or possess specialized knowledge, you can develop a niche and establish yourself as an expert by using digital and social media to your advantage:

2. Do your research. Use bookmarking sites like Digg and Delicious and advanced searches such as Google News, Google Blogs and Google Scholar to find relevant news and people who are concerned about, knowledgeable about and affected by the issue you’re exploring. When you find interesting sources, reach out to them on blogs, Twitter, Facebook groups and email. People like to talk about themselves and share their expertise.

3. Start a blog and participate on others. Regret the Error’s editor Craig Silverman looked for a topic no one was covering, found it in accuracy and corrections in the news and went live with a blog two weeks later. Personal Branding expert Dan Schawbel found inspiration from a magazine article about personal branding and started blogging about it that night. Investigative reporter Kristen Lombardi established her journalistic cred reporting on institutional indifference to cover-ups of sexual assault, and connected with advocates, victims and their loved ones via contact on blogs.

Whether you are a new journalist looking to create an online footprint or an established reporter who has been laid off, blogging offers a way to show initiative as well as your talent. And don’t be afraid of having more than one blog; you may have more than one area of interest.

4. Establish an searchable identity. Use the “One Voice” principle of public relations to create a consistent identity across your social media and professional profiles.

  • Decide what name you want to be known by professionally. Make sure it’s unique enough (such as Jennifer Gaie Hellum) to allow you to be found on the first page of a Google search.
  • Use that name for your Twitter account and any online comments. This will increase your online presence and increase your profile in search. (Tweeting under a clever moniker rather than your professional name might appear to add personality to your identity, but it doesn’t get you direct credit for your contributions.)
  • Create one avatar and use it whenever you need to post an image for an online profile.
  • Create a LinkedIn profile. Include your avatar, blog, portfolio site, Twitter feed and links to any online profiles on your page.

5. Own your domain name. For a small investment, you can secure your professional name as a domain name for a personal portfolio site. Whether you are employed or looking for work, a portfolio site is your online resume. Even if you have a bio page on your employer’s site, a portfolio is a vital way to present yourself comprehensively and define your brand for your audience, colleagues and potential employers. You should include a resume, your cumulative work, any professional goals or mission statement and links to social media. Include multimedia elements whenever possible.

6. Create a Google Profile. Like a portfolio page, a Google Profile is your opportunity to present your digital brand and allows you to define the first listing people find when they do a Google search of your name. It’s generally a more flexible profile than a professional portfolio site and would be where you could feel comfortable adding a personal element to your personal brand (sometimes referred to as your authentic brand or your inner and outer brands). This profile belongs to, former head of washingtonpost.com, now president of digital strategy for Allbritton Communications.

 

7. Tweet. Tweet often. A lot of veteran journalists have resisted signing up for Twitter, believing that the micro-blogging site is a fad and a distraction. In fact, Twitter’s power as a means of creating a network and finding story ideas, trends and sources is becoming increasingly more clear. If you are new to Twitter or have yet to become a regularly user, this Twitter checklist offers a practical plan for getting into the habit of posting relevant tweets to build your community and brand.

  • Follow colleagues, news organizations and individual journalists. Go to their pages and see who they follow.
  • Pay attention to weekly #FollowFriday and #ff hashtags to see who others are recommending. Participate in #followfriday to recommend Twitter users who you find authoritative on your subject area.
  • Send well-crafted tweets that use keywords and hashtags to increase their visibility and drive traffic to your blog.
  • Use hashtags to tag your tweets for maximum visibility.
  • Use a Twitter application like TweetDeck to manage your tweets and monitor relevant topics.
  • Re-tweet and comment on tweets related to your niche.
  • Consider the following strategy of following who follows you, which allows you to send direct messages (DMs) for private conversations.
  • Tweet responsibly. If you look at your Twitter stream and it doesn’t make a compelling case for why someone should trust or hire you, ask yourself what it’s contributing to your digital profile. If you can’t think of a good answer, delete it.

8. Join a professional social network. Ning groups like Wired Journalists give the opportunity to find and connect with other journalists who are interested in your beat.

9. Seek the input and advice of veteran journalists. Social media has broken down the hierarchy of professional org charts and created direct access to people. By using social media, blogs, LinkedIn and Twitter, I have communicated in the past four months with many prominent journalists, including NPR CEO Vivian Schiller, NPR reporter Don Gonyea, Jim Brady, Craig Silverman, Terry Greene Sterling, Kristen Lombardi, Dan Schawbel and Mignon Fogarty (aka Grammar Girl). Be fearless in reaching out to experienced journalists and experts in your subject area; the worst think they can do is say they can’t help you. Most likely, you will be blown away by how willing people are to help you.

10. Participate in live online chats. Poynter Online has weekly live chats with Joe Grimm aka Ask the Recruiter. Journalism students, professors and working journalists log on each week to discuss relevant topics. Transcripts are posted following the chats and logged on the site.

11. Be a true multimedia journalist. Take the steps to learn basic skills in video/audio editing and photograph. Become familiar with social media sites that feature them and create your own content.

  • Post videos on your website or video-sharing sites like YouTube.
  • Learn to create a podcast. (Click here to hear how Grammar Girl went from being a freelance writer/editor to creating her podcast.)
  • Learn to embed audio and video.

    • Learn to use Photoshop and create an account on Flickr.
    • Learn HTML and get comfortable with inserting code into blogposts, such as this post on interviewing for media jobs:

12. Stretch yourself intellectually. Keep on top of what’s new in social media by reading Mashable and pay attention to personal branding experts. Look for seminars and workshops to get firsthand advice and skills from journalists who are successfully and strategically using social media.

Why Your Twitter Name Matters (or How I Met @JeffJarvis)

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In my previous post, Regret the Error’s Craig Silverman advised journalists “to own your own domain name and Twitter ID and be conscious of what you’re doing with them.” I own my domain name and have good intentions of having a fabulously impressive portfolio site someday (thanks to the services of a talented techie friend), but in the meantime I’ve been relying on my blog and my eponymous Twitter account to help define my professional brand.

Tim McGuire, one of our professors here at Cronkite, was the first to mention personal brands to us when he stressed the opportunity costs of having a Twitter user name that isn’t your given name.

He shared the story of an undergrad who had been sending insightful tweets about Arizona and Wisconsin sports under a cryptic user name. Local sports radio hosts began commenting on the tweets but never mentioned him by name because they didn’t know the identity of who had posted them. Tim advised the student to change his user name so he could be credited for his knowledgeable comments, and within a short time he was invited to contribute to the radio program broadcasts.

Tim’s example compelled several grad students to change their Twitter user names from clever “handles” to their names. Heather Billings, my above-mentioned friend and our resident “pro-jo” (her name for programmer journalists), had been tweeting under a nickname but changed it to @hbillings following Tim’s advice. Weeks later, while attending a journalism conference in New York at the Paley Center, Heather spotted “What Would Google Do?” author Jeff Jarvis and sent a tweet about his being in the row behind her. We had read Jeff’s book in Tim’s class, and after he agreed to discuss it with us via Skype, he’d acquired rock-star status amongst our cohort.

Another one of our professors, Dan Gillmor, heard us talking about Jeff during a break and offered to introduce us to him. But before Dan had the chance, Jeff recognized Heather’s name on her name tag from her tweet and introduced himself. Heather and I ended up spending the better part of an hour talking with Jeff about his book and the role of pro-jos in digital journalism.

Heather’s tweet had been her virtual business card.

In fact, Jeff told us that when he saw her tweet, he pulled up her Twitter profile, looked at her photo and name, and scanned the room to find her.

Tim and Craig’s advice about Twitter user names is simple yet powerful. Tweets with people’s names and faces attached to them make an impact each time they’re viewed. I’ve been using Twitter for about eight months and feel I know the people I follow because I see their names and faces every day:

Yep, people like @danschawbel, @jeffjarvis, and @scottleadingham are some of my tweeps. I bet I could pick them out in a crowded conference hall (and hope someday they’ll recognize me, too).

Note (12/14/10): The tweet images originally in this post no longer are available. Similar representations were added in their place. JGH

Written by Jennifer Gaie Hellum

April 27, 2010 at 10:36 am

Using Social Media as a Journalistic Tool

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I had the privilege last week to spend over an hour speaking to The Center for Public Integrity’s Kristen Lombardi about how she conducts her research for investigative stories. I wasn’t surprised to hear that social media had a place in her toolkit.

She told me that one of the ways she and her co-reporter Kristin Jones found sources for their recent series on campus sexual assault was by putting up queries on blogs looking for students who would talk about being assaulted and who filed reports of sexual assaults.

“We received responses from a lot of people—“the silent majority”—who didn’t report their attacks. We wanted to find out why they never reported firsthand and also wanted the accounts of those who went through the process of reporting to campus police or judicial affairs departments,” said Lombardi.

Campus judicial proceedings records aren’t subject to FOIA, so social media proved to be a crucial part of finding victims who would allow them access to their records.

This recent post on Mashable points out how many other journalists are using Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, blogs and other social media to develop a beat and cultivate sources:

  • Finding leads, noticing trends
  • Finding sources
  • Crowdsourcing
  • Giving a voice to the voiceless
  • YouTube (as a resource)
  • Sharing/vetting stories
  • Creating community
  • Building a brand

Even if you’re not ready to jump in and embrace social media, take a minute to at least familiarize yourself with their potential and learn how to use them. You’ll quickly realize how a simple search using Google’s “blog” filter,  a TweetDeck column for a hashtag or keyword, or a Facebook fan page can tell you a lot about what people are saying about a particular subject.

(How do you think I found the Mashable article in the first place?)


Written by Jennifer Gaie Hellum

April 13, 2010 at 2:46 am

A Nod to Tom Peters' definitive article: "The Brand Called You"

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Whenever I do Google searches to generate blog post topics on building your personal brand, I invariably come across blogs that mention Tom Peters‘ 1997 article in Fast Company entitled “The Brand Called You.” I remember reading his book “In Search of Excellence” for an undergrad public relations class in 1988, which is ironic to me because sometimes I feel like this blog is more about PR than it is about journalism. But I guess that’s the point: journalists in growing numbers are becoming solely responsible for promoting their work as jobs are eliminated.

And it seems as though Tom Peters saw this coming way before the news industry was ready (or willing) to hear it. Although he references the Net, your Rolodex and beepers, much of what he had to say about taking control of your professional identity in 1997 sounds as fresh and as urgent today as it did then:

“The good news — and it is largely good news — is that everyone has a chance to stand out. Everyone has a chance to learn, improve, and build up their skills. Everyone has a chance to be a brand worthy of remark.”

To think he felt such certainty of professional manifest destiny before the web’s power was fully realized, before web 2.0 and the era of “Have Blog, Will Prosper.” (From the recent dates of the comments, it’s clear others find his ideas to be timely, too.)

Check out his challenges and calls to action and consider what you’re doing to define your journalistic brand, but read them while keeping in mind all the powerful ways social media can help you the achieve them.

“What makes you different?” Can you define it in 15 words or less, as he suggests, or within the limits of a Twitter profile? Have you crafted a personal tagline for your personal web site and portfolio? Are you using social media to define your professional niche, through the tweets you send and the comments you leave? Have you found others with similar interests and connected with them through LinkedIn, Facebook or Twitter?

“What’s the pitch for you?” Are you using social media to increase your web presence in a way that’s consistent with your brand? Do your tweets, Facebook posts, Flickr streams or blog posts betray the image your wish to portray? Do they target the kind of work you want to do?

“What’s the real power of you?” How are you increasing your credibility? Are you leaving comments on blogs? Do you participate in live chats? Do you make references in your blog to relevant work you admire?

“What’s loyalty to you?” Are you using social media to create a following of readers and colleagues to engage in conversations? Not only do social media offer opportunities to express your brand identity, they also have become essential for researching stories and finding sources.

“What’s the future of you?” Have you created a strategy for where you want your career to go? Are you making contacts with people at those organizations and staying informed about them and their careers?

As the “CEO of You” in the digital age, the corporate ladder of you is in fact a series of links and clicks, all at YOUR fingertips.

http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/10/brandyou.html

Using Social Media Skills to Find Journalism Jobs

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It’s spring break at the Cronkite School this week, and although some students are spending their time relaxing, others are busy searching for summer jobs and internships. Poynter Online had an excellent post on their Ask the Recruiter blog yesterday about the social media skills journalists need to find work in today’s job climate. (Interestingly, I watched the post make the re-tweet rounds on Twitter, proof that many journalists already are up to the task.) The article featured several industry leaders and discussed the skills their organizations are looking for in new hires. It’s definitely worth your time to read it and bookmark it for future reference.

I was just about to write a quick post about the blog when I got a tweet announcing a live chat was about to begin with the post’s author Joe Grimm, a visiting journalist at the Michigan State University School of Journalism. The tweet said the chat would focus on unexpected ways to find jobs, so I took the opportunity to participate and asked Joe some questions about how social media and personal branding can play into job searches:

Joe Grimm, Poynter: When I think about finding jobs in unexpected ways, I think of two things. One is looking for new jobs or new wrinkled (sic) on old jobs; the other is new ways of finding jobs or differentiating yourself.

Jennifer Gaie Hellum, ASU: As journalism grad students, we’re hearing a lot about how we have an advantage knowing how to use social media. Yet some of us are concerned that we will be limited to social media tasks at the expense of getting news-gathering and storytelling experience. What advice do you have on how to strategically use our skills without limiting our exposure to the craft?

Joe Grimm, Poynter: Jennifer, this has always been a concern. People with scarce skills are forever getting pigeon-holed. They are happy to get in the door, but not very happy about being pushed away from the things they love to do. This is a great subject to work hard on in the negotiations for a job. Get some commitments in writing.

Jennifer Gaie Hellum, ASU: Your post yesterday about social media skills affirmed much of what we’re being taught at the Cronkite School at ASU. We talk a lot about personal branding and being entrepreneurial journalists. Do you see news organizations adapting to these dynamics in their approaches to hiring, or is this just new jargon for freelancing?

Joe Grimm, Poynter: Oh, no. People are serious about social media. I think some managers do not have a well-defined concept of what they are asking for, so it is a good thing to probe in an interview. But these skills, as well as audience analysis, will only get more important, not less so. This does not seem to me to be a fad.

It is easy to be cynical about entrepreneurship when we see some places paying so little for freelance work. Places are looking for people to be INTRpreneurs, if you will allow me, to help them innovate. This is new.

Jennifer Gaie Hellum, ASU: I’m not so much asking if social media is a fad but rather the “journalist as a brand” phenomenon. We are being encouraged to establish ourselves on social media as a way to define our voices and areas of interest through the tweets we send and the comments we make.

Joe Grimm, Poynter: We have a paradox happening, Newspapers are eliminating specialty beats and critics, but it makes no sense for any of us to be generic. We need to stand out — for good reasons — and that means to have good, marketable journalistic brand identities. The generic people — forgive me — are not getting called.

On networking, remember the power of loose ties — the people who are not closest to you hear different information than you do and can bring you leads. Value the people who you don’t know best or who are friends of friends.

Jennifer Gaie Hellum, ASU: Often I see status posts on LinkedIn of people who are looking for jobs or looking to hire. The key to all these examples (mentioned in throughout this chat session) seems to be ACTIVELY employing whatever networking tool you are using.

Joe Grimm, Poynter: Amen, Jennifer. Networking is an ongoing activity. Not just what we do when we’re needy.

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You can read the entire chat transcript here:

(Chat embed courtesy of Poynter Online)

Follow Me, and I'll Follow You

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I came across the link below in my Tweetdeck column titled “Social Media Journalists.” (I have permanent columns set up for hashtags and keywords to help generate ideas for my blog.)  Although the article includes how marketing and PR professionals use social media, it also has useful examples of what some established journalists are doing to maximize its power.

One of the things that caught my eye was how Julio Ojeda-Zapata, Technology Editor at St. Paul Pioneer Press, uses Twitter to communicate with sources:

“One of my key social-media tactics for work is a bit obscure: I autofollow everyone who follows me (using SocialToo). The reason for this: Crucial exchanges for stories occur via DM, which is why I do not want to ever think about whether there is reciprocal DM-ing with this or that person. Once this is set up, I can use Twitter as a sounding board with questions related to stories, get initial responses via public tweeting, then take them into private DM-ing as needed (or switch to e-mail or the phone). With close to 10,000 followers now, this is a system that works well – with parallel sourcing via ProfNet and HARO, which I see as two legs of a tripod. Twitter is the third.”

I don’t follow nearly as many people as he does, but his approach to being followed definitely made me reassess how I respond to strangers who choose to follow me. I certainly find the DM feature to be an efficient way to communicate with friends and colleagues, but now I’m going to remember that it’s one more way to build a network.

Take a few minutes to check out the rest of the post from The Online Marketing Blog and see if any of the recommendations can give you ideas on how to use social media to follow a lead, cultivate sources or build your brand.

http://www.toprankblog.com/2010/02/journalists-search-social-media/

If nothing else, you might find some knowledgeable folks to follow on Twitter… and they just might follow you back.

Written by Jennifer Gaie Hellum

March 9, 2010 at 2:18 am

Twitter as Your #Resumé

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I have a confession to make: I really like using Twitter. Most of my friends and family can’t imagine why I’d waste my time with it, but I have fun watching news break as it ripples through the dozens of news sites I follow (usually lead by @breakingnews– go figure!) I enjoy checking out trending topics during a pop-culture moment and following what other journalists find noteworthy. Although none of my friends have a problem with texting, most wouldn’t dream of sending a DM with a quick question or comment.

How journalists use Twitter was one of the most pervasive topics at the Carnegie-Knight Initiative’s conference, A Way Forward: Solving the Challenges of the News Frontier, held in New York earlier this month. Twitter factored into every breakout session and panel discussion. That was when I fully appreciated how essential it has become as a journalistic tool.

Mathew Ingram, a Canadian journalist I follow, recently sent a tweet about Twitter from the Canadian Association of Journalists’ Innovate News conference on Jan. 30:

Jim Brady says that he follows people who apply for jobs on Twitter, to see how they use it, and if they don’t use it “that’s a problem”

If Brady, the former executive editor of washingtonpost.com made such a statement, that’d be quite an endorsement. Now president of digital strategy for Allbritton Communications, he made the comment during a panel discussion at the journalism education conference in Toronto. Given that he’s currently developing a local online news site for Washington, D.C., and planning to build a staff of up to 50 people, this pro-Twitter comment caught the attention of Twittering journalists.

When I contacted him to verify whether he’d made the comment, Brady confirmed he had but said he wanted to clarify one part since the tweet didn’t allow for context. “That’s mostly right,” he said, “though I added something to the effect that it’s not a dealbreaker if you don’t use Twitter, but since this web site is going to use social media aggressively, it is a strike against you if you’re not using those tools now.”

He added he does look at Twitter feeds of people who have applied for jobs so he can see how they’re using Twitter. “It’s going to be part of their jobs,” he said, “so why not take a look?”

The most compelling part of Brady’s statement for me was how he thought Twitter should be used. “It’s important for journalists to use Twitter, and as more than just a place to post their stories. They should post other stories relevant to their beats, provide some color around stories they’re reporting and engage the reader,” said Brady.

This sentiment affirms what we are being taught at Cronkite about how journalists can use social media to build an online identity, connect with their communities and strengthen their personal brands. Well-crafted tweets can help define who you are and increase your exposure.

In addition to contacting Brady, I also reached out to Mathew Ingram to find out why he sent out the tweet. He emailed me the following response:

“I re-tweeted what he said not necessarily because I agreed with it, but simply because I thought it was an interesting comment from a guy who was in a position to hire people for a new-media venture, and therefore his take on it was newsworthy. He told me later that he saw a lot of the re-tweets and thought he probably was more emphatic than he really meant to be, and that he certainly wouldn’t exclude anyone because they didn’t tweet– but that he saw using social-media tools as a crucial part of a new-media job, and therefore would like to see people using them and experimenting. I would agree with that perspective.”

So whether you’re putting together your resumé for an online news job or planning to blog as a career, remember that your Twitter stream can play a supporting role in the brand you build for yourself. (Now try and say that in 140 characters or less.)

Written by Jennifer Gaie Hellum

March 2, 2010 at 2:21 am